Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Currently- July 2017

Bing in Ming by Patricia Hansen


The thing with writing is that it becomes easier the more you do it. The opposite is also true. I'm up to my knees in drafts, lists, bullet points, and snippets. Completing them is another thing, especially since my intention is to change the blog somewhat and make it much (MUCH) less product-centric, but still informative and fun. I don't want to buy every highlighter on the market or swatch all the liquid lipsticks until my skin falls off. My intention has never been to tell you "go and buy (more) stuff" It's about sharing thoughts, opinions, experiences related to beauty and perfume. But just as one can get overwhelmed clicking the "What's "New" button on Ulta's website and getting twelves pages full of things you're supposed to covet and buy, the same can be said about beauty blogging (or blogging in general), especially when you refuse to be a pawn for anyone who's trying to sell something.


Book
After several books  started and abandoned (the most annoying one was The Vintage Housekeeper Circle by Alison May. I thought it was going to be a meditating on vintage housekeeping practices as well as practical advice. Instead I got an unedited FlyLady in a Laura Ashley apron). I did enjoy a  frilly summer reading of the Crazy Rich Asians trilogy with its over-the-top descriptions of food, couture, and home decor. Now I've downloaded B.J. Novak's short stories collection, One More Thing, and that's what I'll be reading tonight.

Music






TV
After months of comfort-watching every Star Trek episode from all the series' incarnations, the husband and I moved to contemporary television. We binged on several favorites: Grace and Frankie, The Americans, and Master of None (probably the smartest comedy on TV. Maybe ever). But right now it's all about Orphan Black and Game of Thrones. I had butterflies in my stomach anticipating the latter's season premier.

Makeup
Edward Bess Black Sea Precious Pearl Perfector. It's a silicone primer for those looking for a luminous dewy finish that still has a strong grip on foundation. It's given new life to a couple of foundations I was about to abandon as too drying.

Perfume
Dryad by Papillon Artisan Perfumes. Liz Moores might have created the best modern green chypre. It's like a 70s jumpsuit made of Scarlett O'Hara's green velvet curtain dress.

Frequently Worn Outfit/Item
A striped silk short shirtdress I bought from Banana Republic at the start of the season.

Food
Cherries. And more cherries.

Bane
The combination of humidity and creepy crawlers that makes stepping out to feed the squirrels into an episode of Fear Factor.

Joy


Also, the "who's a good boy?" conversations I have with George as we settle for the night.

Link
Just in case you haven't read this interview with former British Vogue fashion director,  Lucinda Chambers, caused a big brouhaha last month, to the point of letters from lawyers. As a result a few sentences relating to the way Ms. Chambers was fired got removed. I've read (and saved) the complete article as well as the amended one, and to me the important thing was not the HR kerfuffle, but the insight about fashion, magazines, and advertisers. The story behind the deflated and disappointing cover below, and the reason Ms. Chambers hasn't actually read Vogue in decades.



Quote
" I mean, movies are the worst, because the movie business is failing terribly and they think they have some amazing model that’s going to fix it all, and it all involves hiring a girl with 2 million Instagram followers. Hasn’t worked yet. And then in television it’s the same thing. Parts are offered to these YouTube sensations."
Jordan Gavaris (Felix on Orphan Black) in an interview with Vulture.

Random Thought
Eye shadow topper, lip topper (we used to call it lip gloss), blush topper- a second layer of makeup all over your face. There's a large Smashbox palette out right now that's all about toppers, which reminded of this. What's old is new again. They say that when you've lived through a trend once you should avoid it when it comes back. But what if I like an iridescent blue over my eye shadow?

Wishlist
To get my groove back.

How've you been? What's on your list of loves and banes? Any wishes and recommendations?

Friday, June 30, 2017

Aftelier- Memento Mori Perfume Review

The Parting of Lancelot and Guinevere, photo by Julia Margaret Cameron, 1874*

The sample of Aftelier's Memento Mori has been sitting on the side table for many months. I'd carefully open it, take a whiff, and quickly put the cap back on. Occasionally I'd dab the smallest droplet I could manage onto my wrist, usually when the husband wasn't around to protest. Something about the dirty bodily butter smelled offensive to him from the very first moment. I'm all for butter. Danish butter, Irish butter, orris butter- they're all good. Do all of them belong in a perfume? Perhaps. When the perfume is a personal more or less bespoke item that becomes part of the wearer and a signature statement.

Memento Mori is not a condiment to go with your fresh baguette. It's too disturbing for that because of a strong animalic thread that goes through every stage of the perfume's unraveling. The dying violets heaped upon the butter here and here contribute to the forlorn atmosphere. There's a lot of skin here, but not the one of a present person you can touch and see. I picture going through the personal belongings of a loved one that have been stored and preserved in a clean and undisturbed attic. As you open an old leather suitcase you find a jacket you've borrowed countless times, letters bound in a faded blue ribbon, a book that you open to find a press wildflower from that summer long ago.

As the memories creep in with scents you haven't smelled in years the emotions also rush in, overwhelming you. You have no idea why they call it bittersweet. It's neither bitter nor sweet. The taste in your mouth is of salty tears and the scents you recall are rich and thick. You go outside and walk the all too familiar path until you reach the spot that used to bring you much solace. Today you see that someone has rearranged a handful of stones and scattered violets on the ground around them. You pick one up, the petals no longer fresh or bright. You'll press it and save it in the old book, adding the scents of this day, the air, the present, to the vault of memories upstairs.

Memento Mori ($180, 8ml) is available from Aftelier's website. The sample for this review want to me by Mandy Aftel.


* This was one of those times I knew immediately which image I was going to use for the review. I've been fascinated for decades with the work of Julia Margaret Cameron, a Victorian era photographer, whose often staged scenes have a ghostly atmosphere. This was long before the internet brought another Victorian photographic "memento mori" genre to my attention (don't google if you don't have to). The parting of Guinevere and Lancelot has all the sorrow, doom, love, passion, and regret encapsulated, as we the readers know what the future will bring them,while they only have their grief and perhaps a premonition. Valar Morghulis.

Monday, June 26, 2017

Book Review- The Price of Illusion: A Memoir by Joan Juliet Buck


When I received a PR pitch about Joan Juliet Buck's memoir, The Price of Illusion, I was certain it was going to be a hate-read. Ms. Buck had a certain reputation based on her tenure as the American editor-in-chief of Vogue Paris between 1994 and 2001, when she was fired amid a scandal caused by a whirlwind of rumors. She was succeeded by Carine Roitfeld, who didn't seem to harbor much warm fuzzies for her predecessor. A decade later Ms. Buck, by then a freelance writer, took an assignment from Anna Wintour. She was to go to Syria and interview the first lady, Bashar al-Assad's wife, for Vogue magazine’s March 2011 “Power Issue.” The unfortunately titled "A Rose in the Desert" article was the end of Joan Juliet Buck's relationship with Vogue, as well as with readers around the world. With that in mind I passed on the offer to phone-interview the author and bought my own digital copy.

As I expected, the memoir has an underlying apologetic undercurrent as well as a good dose of rationalization. What I didn't expect was for it to be good, in parts enchanting and enlightening, sometimes juicy, often surprisingly frank, and almost consistent in its flow and narrative. I was captivated by Ms. Buck's stories about her childhood, her parents and grandparents, growing up in the world of movie-making surrounded by mega-celebrities who were close family friends. This upbringing doesn't breed ordinary people. It might, however, encourage a skewed worldview and character flaws, which is how Ms. Buck sees the road that caused her to make some very bad decisions.

Do I buy it? To a point, maybe. I'm not sure if and how I would have found it in me to to ask Anna Wintour what the hell had she been thinking and to send her to find a moral backbone. The book, though, offers a lot more than excuses. The stories and the worlds they paint are fascinating for someone interested in vintage movies, London and Paris of past decades, and, of course, fashion. The anecdotes are rich in details about people, decor, and stunning clothes. Ms. Buck doesn't hold back  the snark regarding certain people (every Karl Lagerfeld mention is delicious), but a thread of sorrow and regret saves the book from being more mean-spirited than necessary. The decades and locations come to life in front of the reader and you are free to make judgment for yourself. I might have cringed at certain points, but I was not bored for a second.

The Price of Illusion: A Memoir by Joan Juliet Buck (originally $16.02 for the digital version on Amazon) is currently available for $1.99.

Image: Vogue Paris December 1994/January 1995 cover. The movie themed issue is one of Ms. Buck's most iconic. Model Karen Mulder posing as Marlen Dietrich, photographed by Michael Thompson

Friday, June 23, 2017

Summer In New Jersey- My Top Pick Perfumes


My perfume picks this summer will focus on the here and now. Or mostly on the "here". Scents that evoke life in suburban New Jersey as I know it. The image above is a vintage postcard from Cape May, the southernmost point in the state (lovely bed & breakfasts, quaint and well-preserved Victorian houses, gorgeous beach where you might be lucky enough to see a pod of dolphins frolicking), but "my" New Jersey is up north, and my picks probably reflect that.

Tomato leaf scents are surprisingly polarizing. Some people can't stand them, but I'm in the opposite camp. Jersey tomatoes, just picked from my own garden, are one of the greatest pleasures of summer, and I love rubbing the leaves and stems on my hands. The most widely known perfume utilizing a tomato leaf note is the classic Sisley Eau de Campagne, but reformulations have taken away so much of the charm it now smells too generic and thin. Instead, two of Dawn Spencer Hurwitz's perfumes hit this summery spot like no other. Divine Gardens is a leafy green chypre That smells like my yard on a hot dry summer day. Tomato leaves, tagetes, and a herbal bouquet just ready to go into the salad. Speaking of herbs, the second DSH perfume that fits here is Agrestic from the perfumer's Cannabis collection. I'm not an expert on the subject, but to me this is a dry green and grassy perfume that entices with vetiver, moss, and a very noticeable tomato leaf note.

Speaking of grass, the scent of a just-mowed lawn is a weekly summer pleasure. The husband amuses himself in creating patterns in the back yard, but I just lean back and take in the smell that wafts inside. Many green perfumes have a grass note somewhere in the composition, but the most literal interpretation I've ever knew was the 90s gem Grass by the Gap (available on eBay in exchange of your firstborn). Luckily, we have Grass Accord by CB I Hate Perfume, which is exclusive to his gallery if I remember correctly (worth a phone call if you want to bathe in fresh green grass). For a more complex composition that has all the grassy blades but also the dreamy quality of a watercolor depicting a summer landscape my absolute favorite is Parfumerie Generale's Papyrus de Ciane.

Marigold flowers (tagetes) are not just the most cheerful sight, they're also a natural bug repellent. We plant them every year around the tomato and pepper bed, and even Arlo, our groundhog, avoids the area. Tagetes play a supporting role in the background of many perfumes, but it's rare to find it as the star, perhaps because of its bitterness. Tagetes Femme by EnVoyage took a while to grow on me, probably because of the black current note and the general fruitiness. By it is a summer tagetes  perfume that's worthy of your skin space if you're a marigold fan (one f my cats is named Marigold and she isn't even orange). A more sultry tagetes perfume is the beautiful Tagete by Profumum Roma. It marries marigold with tuberose and jasmine, making it a perfumy and elegant choice for a dressed-up day.

Speaking of sultry, summer nights mean tuberose and other luscious white flowers. We can sit here until fall and debate Fracas vs. Carnal Flower vs. every maneater white floral under the sun. However, I wanted to point you in the direction of Fleur09 by Maria Christofilis. It's not really new as the perfume was released in 2014 (I bought a bottle for my mother, the Queen of White Flowers, soon after it first appeared in NYC).  The brand is getting traction now that two more gorgeous perfumes have launched. Fleur09 is a tuberose leaning towards orange blossom with a hint of honey as it warms up on the skin, perfect for a night on the town.

There's a reason vetiver perfumes are one my summer staples. Summer here can be anything from glorious and picture-perfect to the dreaded triple H (Hot, Humid, Hazy). Days that feel like you're moving through a past-its-prime soup call from something that cuts through the air like magic. That's vetiver for me. My newest love in this category comes from Monsillage, the brand that gave us Eau de Celeri among other gems. The newest launch, Pays Dogon, is among the most complex and fascinating vetiver perfumes I know, without sacrificing sheer beauty. It's dry, raw, and spicy, and the added touch of ginger is exactly what we need these days.

One last sojourn into my back yard and a couple of old favorites. I started growing fennel years ago and discovered that on scorching days the fennel bed feels the air in its very distinct anise-like scent. It's another love it or hate it smell, and I'm firmly in the "adore" camp. The tender green stems of fennel are not the most assertive as a perfume note, so to get the effect of the fragranced garden I turn to absinth perfumes. They're not as gourmand as proper anise perfumes and are decidedly greener, which is what I want. There are several excellent absynthe perfumes on the market, and my favorite two are the classic L'Artisan Fou d'Absinthe and the less-famous and more herbal Absinthe by Ava Luxe.

What are you wearing this summer?

For more summer perfume suggestions please visit my fiends at Bois de Jasmin, Grain de Musc, and Now Smell This.

Thursday, May 04, 2017

Yellow Eye Shadow FotD- The Middle-Aged Version of Lisa Eldridge's Look


The mega eye shadow palette I had in high school included a wonderful canary yellow color that had one of the best textures in the set (the navy blue and deep purple were horribly stiff and unblendable, while one of the greens developed a hard surface almost instantly, which had me digging in with a tiny spoon). As a result I experimented with a lot, which surprisingly didn't rattle my mother too much leading me to decided that yellow eye shadow was my thing. Then the eighties ended.



Funny enough, the inclusion of a yellow eye shadow in the recently launched Viseart Warm Matte palette almost stopped me from buying it, but in the end my adoration of the other palettes I have from the brand has won, and I did want to play again. Then came Lisa Eldridge's brilliant video How to wear yellow eyeshadow - and look great! and it has inspired me further.  Of course, I had to put my own spin on it to adjust not just for my coloring (about  half a shade lighter and less yelow than Lisa's model, Farhanah), but also eye shape, and let's face it: age. The biggest difference here is that Lisa used a primary yellow while the one in Viseart's Warm Mattes is tinged with an orangey mustard that makes it easier to wear and , in my opinion, more sophisticated. If you want a true bright sunshiny yellow in a better texture than the MAC one Lisa used (see all the falldown in the video that appeared like a pollen explosion until Lisa cleaned it up), Viseart offers it in their Matte Editorial palette (I don't have it. For now), but I've seen swatches of a similar concept from NYX, Sleek, and Urban Decay.



Here's what I did:



Face
I applied the thinnest layer of Smashbox classic Photo Finish primer. My face was already well-coated in an SPF50 (Hada Labo), so I just wanted to make sure I had something between that and my foundation.
Armani Luminous Silk Foundation in 5.5
Eve Pearl Salmon Concealer in Light/Medium under the eyes, to get rid of any green/blue/purple that clashes with the eye shadow. I didn't feel the need for any additional concealing, so I used none, and have completely forgotten to set or finish anything with powder, which was a mistake. My under eyes creased significantly after two hours. My bad.

Eyes
Here's the main event.
NARS  Eye Shadow Base (applied considerably less than Lisa did because the eye shadow didn't need a thick or tacky base).
Viseart Warm Mattes: #1 all over the mobile lid, with a lay-down flat brush. I actually built up the color a little bit, because on my dark lid it was more muted than desired. Maybe I should get the Editorial palette. I covered most of the mobile lid from corner to corner, then mixed #2 and #3 for the crease the way Lisa did with her Huda palette. I don't have the latter and don't plan on getting it. I think.
Learning from Lisa's on-camera mistake, I decided to use a brown liner from the start. Laura Mercier Creme eyeliner in Espresso is discontinued, but Bobbi Brown and everyone else seem to have an alternative. It doesn't matter which, just pick a rich dark brown. My trick for faking a wing on deep set lids is to start it way before the actual end of the lid, thicken it as I go and finish before the lower part of the brow bone creates the abyss of despair known as my eye socket. Your mileage may vary.
Since Farhanah and I were not born in the same century, I didn't put anything on the lower lash line.
Mascara: Lancome Grandiose. It's official. I love it much more than the Extreme version. I had to go through multiple full size tubes of each, but the regula Grandiose gives me fluffier lashes.

Brows
Suqqu powder. That green one.

Cheeks
An ancient Chanel limited edition spring blush picked randomly from my drawer. Any warmer pink/peach would do, and you probably have more options in that color  category than I do. Pay attention to the application in the video. It makes all the difference.
Stila Heaven's Hue Highlighter in Bronze, which I bought the second I watched the video for the first time. I skipped it initially (I bought Kitten) because I thought it was too orange and glittery. It's not. It's a summer gold, slightly metallic, which I now apply using an old Shu Uemura fan brush. It's goat, I think, and gives the lightest yet even finish.

Lips
Mac Prep&Prime lip primer (see age difference), then I copied Lisa's work exactly: MAC Whirl pencil all over the lip and a good coating of By Terry Baume de Rose.

Other Stuff
Top by DVF
SotD Atelier des Ors Iris Fauve
I skipped jewelry other than a vintage ring that matched my nail polish. A yellow eye shadow is more than enough.


Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Glossier- Cloud Paint in Dusk & Haze







I have no problem admitting that it was Lisa Eldridge's fault. The moment I finished watching her "Illuminated Blush Glow" video three weeks ago I immediately clicked to Glossier's website and ordered two tubes of the new Cloud Paint. While Lisa chose the color Puff for herself I had to consent that my coloring is different  (a constant theme in my life: I do not look like Lisa E.) and picked Dusk (a peachy brown sunkissed color with a side of dulce de leche) and Haze (a classic berry). Who cares about the shade, though? I was utterly seduced by Lisa's promise of a "glossy expensive skin". Visions of the Hadid sisters and Rosie Huntington-Whitely were dancing around my head.

Glossier is a young American brand that has been taking over market share one product at a time. Sometimes it's incredibly successful, such as with their Boy Brow tinted gel (I just purchased my second tube), other times I don't really get it, as was the case with their original Balm Dotcom (I admit the name annoyed me even before I uncorked the tube), which seemed redundant.

But we're here for the liquid/gel blush in its cute paint tube. It's everything I hoped for. The texture is of a watery gel that threatens to burst out of the tube when you first open it (have makeup wipes within reach). Blended on skin the pigment appears natural and free of shimmer. It's semi-sheer but allows for some serious building up, one thin layer after another, and once set it does not meet until it's time to meet a good makeup remover.

The divine Lisa Eldridge has demonstrated application and blending Glossier's Cloud Paint with other face products: foundation, highlighters, and even concealers if you have a spot just where one is supposed to apply blush. The only thing I have to add is that the colors of the Cloud Paints can be mixed with each other to create more shades than the available four. It's a great product for spring, summer, and beyond. Glossier has definitely earned my respect with this one.

Bottom Line: I still don't look like Gigi Hadid, but my cheeks are glowing.


Glossier- Cloud Paint ($18, 10ml each, made in USA) is available from glossier.com.

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Moresque- Aristoqrati


I've mentioned Aristoqrati by Moresque as one of my top perfume picks this spring, and true to that it's the perfume I've been wearing the most over the last couple of months. In another life I might have picked it as my signature scent for the time being, but it's been twenty eight years since I've been loyal to one perfume for longer than six hours. The point is that the blend of spice and geranium is very very enticing.

Moresque (I keep typing Mauresque, as in Serge's Cuir) is a line that follows the Middle Eastern style. I remember liking the Black and the White collections well enough, though none kept my attention span (oud, rose, jasmine--- the usual) until I reached Aristoqrati (from Moresque's Art collection that features even more elaborately decorated bottles). It grabbed me immediately because the nutmeg bursts forcefully from behind the fresh and slightly classic men's cologne opening notes. The astringency of geranium leaves and stems was familiar and nostalgic for me. As a kid I used to crush a leaf and rub it between my fingers, savoring both the smell and the rough yet velvety surface. I still do it sometimes.

Geranium is often used as a companion to rose notes. Its various facets can be herbal, green, even slightly fruity (think of apple geranium in iced tea). It brings out the peppery side of carnations,  and adds a bright sunny feel to heavier blends. This is exactly what happens in Aristoqrati, a perfume that otherwise is an intoxicating nutmeg and patchouli mix that conjures a certain oriental mystery. There's the earthiness of freshly-watered soil of the geranium bed in the inner courtyard, the scent of herbs from the kitchen garden, ancient stone corridors providing shade and coolness in the Mediterranean summer afternoon, and again lots and lots of spices, especially if one decides to go overboard and spray herself silly. It happens. And you cannot wash it off for a while.

A friend asked me back in February, after I've mentioned here that Aristoqrati was my Valentine's Day date night scent whether I didn't feel it was a bit of an odd or masculine pick for the occasion. Obviously, that person was not aware that given the choice I'd wear Nasomatto Duro over Diorissimo anytime. Still, no, I don't think Aristoqrati is gender-specific. If you're a fan of spicy orientals and a generous garnish of nutmeg you're more likely to enjoy this perfume. If you can't wait to put in your geraniums for summer, give it a try. And word to the wise, one or two spritzes will take you throughout the day (and night).

Moresque- Aristoqrati ($375, 1.7oz eau de parfum) is available from OsswaldNYC.com.

Image: Gigi Hadid for Vogue Arabia, Photographed by Inez and Vinoodh, March 2017.

Friday, March 24, 2017

Perfumes for an Italian Spring


We usually go to Italy in the early fall around our anniversary, because that's where the Blond and I have spent our honeymoon. Three years ago we went in early April, and it was decidedly different. The light, the taste of the air, they were abuzz in anticipation, even though the weather itself was on the very cool side most days. We stayed mostly on the Amalfi coast which was bursting with ripe  lemons and oranges, yards and gardens were green and lush (it rained a lot), and the flower boxes in every window were as I've remembered them, blooming with geraniums that seem to be there all year long (how do they do it?). We also bought perfume when a Sorento store was clearing out old stockrooms (vintage!!!)  as well as lines that weren't moving fast enough. It was glorious.

Here are my ten(ish) picks for Italian perfumes that evoke visiting that gorgeous country in the spring. All chosen with love and longing.

1. Bois 1920 Extreme is a modern fougere. Green with a twist, a tonka base, which is the thing to wear if you're sitting in the garden of one of those stunning Florence villas that are now open to public.

2. I obviously had to pick something by Eau d'Italie because their perfumes are incredibly evocative. While my personal favorites are not necessarily the spring ones, you cannot skip Jardin du Poete. That is spring, and that is Italy. As I'm sitting here looking at my backyard which is full of snow I fee an urge to dig through my samples and find it. Bring on the flowers.

3-4.  Never skipping an opportunity to honor the Florentine iris let's go with one of the prettiest (and more elusive), Iris by Hilde Soliani. Also, let's not forget her Il Tuo Tulipano, as it's as spring-like as it gets and can lift the gloom in an instant. A must-have, really.

5. You don't need me to tell you that Italian coffee bars are a staple across the country all year round. I'm not much of a coffee drinker but when in Italy even I will have an espresso and try to people-watch (the suits!) while doing so. Milano Cafe by AbdesSalaam Attar of La Via del Profumo (www.profumo.it) is that. It's more of a four season perfume, but the burst of energy it gives you is all spring.

6. I've had a tab open on my laptop for weeks with a draft for a review of Aristoqrati by Moresque, one of my favorite perfumes in the last several months. The Italian brand is mostly inspired by Middle Eastern perfumery, but the overflowing geranium note on all its facets (rosy, sappy, peppery, and that scent you get on your hands if you've been rubbing and squeezing the juicy green leaves between your fingers) is all Italy and sunshine.

7. (7a, 7b, 7c)No Italian perfume list will ever be complete without Acqua di Parma, it's only a matter of choosing, and my imagination carries me away whenever I start. We talked Iris, and Iris Nobile is lovely, as are the various iterations of Colonia Assoluta, because of all those amazing citrus groves you find seemingly everywhere (at least from Rome south). But it's the blue series of coastal scents and tastes that makes an extra balmy spring day feel like a prelude to vacation. My personal favorites are Cipresso di Toscana, Fico di Amalfi (more late summer than spring, but FIG), and Ginepro di Sardegna.

8. I still can't forgive myself for not visiting the grounds and museum of Santa Maria Novella in Florence back in 1996. I would have came back with my weight in perfume and body products and a new passion for non-mainstream perfumes. But which one is the most spring-like, considering my husband favors Peau d'Espagne while I'm partial to Nostalgia? The answer is the delicate Violetta, with its tender leaves and soft purple petals. Soon they'll bloom in my garden. Soon.

9. One of my all-time spring picks is and has always been the vintage version (as old as one can find) of the classic Lauren. The unique blend of violets and tagetes, crisp and sharp, suggests spring with every whiff. It's one of my favorite perfumes of all time and I have a semi-lifetime supply, but I've vowed not to include impossible-to-find perfumes in these lists. Besides, it's not an Italian perfume, so let's move on. But Italian brand Profumum Roma offers us the lovely Tagete, again, an impression of an Italian villa's gardens, probably at dusk, when the imagination starts flying.

10. I'm still waiting for a burst of springtime energy to propel me into the stratosphere (or to finish laundry. Whatever comes first). In the meantime I've been faking it with Il Profumo Ginger, a mix of ginger and good soap that feels as clean as the fresh morning air on the first day of vacation, when you're eager to go and see what's waiting around the corner.

Wishing you plenty of daffodils and tulips this spring. Please visit m friends at Bois de Jasmin, Grain de Musc, and Now Smell This for their spring picks. What are yours? 

Art:  Galileo Chini, La Primavera, 1914

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